Pierce Herrick and Ann Miller Life in Caton, New York

Pierce Herrick (1804-1887) and Ann Miller (1807-1872)

Herricks Remain in New York

Pierce Herrick was born 19 January 1804 in Norwich, Chenango County, New York. He was the son of Rufus Herrick and Jerusah Pellet Pierce and the grandson of Eleazer Herrick and Mary Rea.

Pierce lived with his family until at least 1820 in Chenango County, New York; he would have been 16. By 1830, however, he is in Caton, New York, a married man. How and when he travelled to Caton is unknown, but Chenango and Steuben Counties are not too far apart — perhaps a day or two of travel in the early 1800s.

Life in Caton, New York

Pierce married Ann Miller in 1830 or 1831 in Caton, Steuben County, New York, where Ann was teaching school.

Ann Miller was born in 1807 in Maryland. Nothing is known about her parents or how or when she got to Caton, New York. If she was indeed teaching there it may be that she went there to get a job.

Pierce and Ann had at least six children:

In the 1840 Census, Pierce is living in Caton, New York with his wife and several small children. (According to the Census, there are 4 males and 3 females in the household, which is one less female child than there should be.)

In 1850, Pierce and Ann are still in Caton and Pierce lists himself as a farmer with $3000 in real estate. Pierce and Ann are 46 and 43, respectively. Their children (still living with them) are Electra, 18; Augustus, 14; Harriet, 12; Joseph, 11; and Lydia M, 11.

By 1860, the family remains in Caton, but the children are growing up. Pierce apparently feels the value of his real estate has gone down by $500 since 1850 and he lists his personal property at $300. William, 25; Harriet, 23; and Lydia, (listed as age 18, but she would only be 15), are still living with their parents. Also living with them is Delos Thornton, 18, a farm labourer.

Time out to Fight in the War

There is a Pierce Herrick who enlisted in the Union Army on 11 June 1861 at the age of 57. He served with the 42nd Infantry Regiment of Pennsylvania. Of those enlisted in that regiment, 11 died of disease or accident and two were killed or mortally wounded. Pierce received a disability discharge on 9 December 1861, so it is likely he was wounded. He left Ann behind with perhaps just one child at home, Myra Lydia at age 16, although just the year before both William and Harriet had been living there, so they may have stayed to keep the farm running, particularly William.

End of life in Corning, New York

After the war, Pierce did fairly well for himself. He and Ann moved to Corning, New York, in 1870 and by then his real estate was valued at $6200 and his personal property at $800. In Corning, only Hattie is still living with them. She is 33 years old. By this time, both Ann and Pierce are in their 60’s.

Ann died on 26 April 1872, probably in Corning, New York. She was 65 years old.

Pierce survived his wife by 15 years, and remained in Corning for quite some time. But in 1885, two years before his death, he is living with the Dumont family in Larned, Pawnee, Kansas. A move from Steuben County, New York, to Pawnee County, Kansas, would not have been undertaken lightly in the mid-1880’s, so Pierce must have had a strong reason to go. It is assumed that the Dumont family may be one of Pierce’s married daughters. However, Mrs. Dumont is listed as “Ann” and Pierce had no daughters named Ann (though Harriet’s name has an “A” for the middle name and she could have well been named after her mother, Ann). The other possibility is that one of the Dumonts is a grandson or granddaughter to Pierce. He died there on 25 April 1887. He was 83 years old.

This page written and researched by Susan Overturf Ingraham, wife of Robert Philip Ingraham, a descendant of Pierce Herrick and Ann Miller. This page last updated on February 2, 2012.

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